Uncertainty, leadership style, and information technology project success in a dynamic public sector environment

by Waller, Eddie B., Jr., Ph.D., CAPELLA UNIVERSITY, 2015, 131 pages; 3724734

Abstract:

While there is considerable research linking leadership style to project outcome, there is little research focused on how uncertainty moderates that relationship. There is even less research focused on how uncertainty moderates that relationship in the public sector, particularly a dynamic public sector environment. This quantitative study investigated whether uncertainty (defined in this study as combined consideration of project team size, project team diversity, and technical complexity) moderated the relationship between leadership style and IT project success in a dynamic (high level of change) public sector environment. The researcher used the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (Bass & Avolio, 2004) to operationalize leadership style, the Project Implementation Profile (Slevin & Pinto, 1986) to operationalize IT project success, and an instrument developed by Aladwani (2002b) to operationalize uncertainty. The researcher used regression and moderation analysis to study the relationship between one independent variable (leadership style), one moderating variable (uncertainty), and one dependent variable (IT project success). The study found a significant and positive relationship between transformational leadership style and IT project success. Moderation analysis indicated that generally low and generally medium levels of uncertainty could moderate the relationship. The study did not find a significant relationship between transactional leadership style and IT project success. Finally, the study found a significant and negative relationship between an IT project manager’s passive/avoidant leadership style and IT project success. Moderation analysis indicated that generally low, generally medium, and generally high levels of uncertainty could significantly moderate the relationship between passive/avoidant leadership style and IT project success.

AdviserMary Robinson@Lind
SchoolCAPELLA UNIVERSITY
Source TypeDissertation
SubjectsManagement; Information technology
Publication Number3724734

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