The relationship between leadership style and courageous followership behavior among United States Air Force senior noncommissioned officers

by Williams, Jeffrey A., Ph.D., CAPELLA UNIVERSITY, 2015, 139 pages; 3718667

Abstract:

Followers are important to the organization’s success but seldom viewed as responsible for the organization’s outcomes. In the leadership literature, the leader is the driver of organizational performance and often gets the credit for its success and blamed for its failures. The same view is held in military cultures where everything rises and falls on leadership. Since followership is an emerging area of study, a quantitative correlational design was used to examine the relationship between the leaders’ leadership style (transformational and transactional) and the followers’ courageous followership behavior from the followers’ perspective. The followers in this study were United States Air Force senior noncommissioned officers (SNCOs; pay grades E7- E8). The theoretical framework for this study was the Courageous Followership Model. Data from a random sample of 83 respondents was collected through use of the 20-item Followership Profile (TFP) and the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ) Short Form 5X. The TFP measured the courageous followership behaviors and the MLQ measured the transformational and transactional leadership behaviors. Correlation analysis was used to examine the data. The findings revealed that there was significant positive correlation between the leaders’ leadership style (transformational and transactional) and the followers’ courageous followership behavior at the 0.05 level of significance.

AdviserGregory Gull
SchoolCAPELLA UNIVERSITY
Source TypeDissertation
SubjectsManagement; Military studies
Publication Number3718667

About ProQuest Dissertations & Theses
With nearly 4 million records, the ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT) Global database is the most comprehensive collection of dissertations and theses in the world. It is the database of record for graduate research.

PQDT Global combines content from a range of the world's premier universities - from the Ivy League to the Russell Group. Of the nearly 4 million graduate works included in the database, ProQuest offers more than 2.5 million in full text formats. Of those, over 1.7 million are available in PDF format. More than 90,000 dissertations and theses are added to the database each year.

If you have questions, please feel free to visit the ProQuest Web site - http://www.proquest.com - or contact ProQuest Support.