The relationship between project manager interpersonal skills and information technology project success

by Deal, Michelle J. L., Ph.D., CAPELLA UNIVERSITY, 2014, 197 pages; 3640259

Abstract:

The most valuable asset to any project, regardless of the industry is the project manager. Research has shown, whether the project fails or succeeds depends on the project manager, and the skills they bring to the table. The research problem in this study is the lack of empirical research regarding the relationship between the interpersonal skills of the project manager and the success and / or failure of large scale IT systems development projects. This quantitative study was conducted to determine what relationships if any existed between the project manager's interpersonal skills and the success or failure of large scale IT systems development projects. The sample for this study consisted of 200 project managers in the United States working on large scale IT systems development projects. The Spearman-Rho results indicated a strong positive relationship between the interpersonal skills and leadership traits of senior managers who manage with a passive leadership style and the primary IT systems development project success factor of cost. There was also a strong positive relationship between the interpersonal skills and leadership traits of senior managers who manage with leadership outcomes and the primary IT systems development project success factor of scheduling. As it pertains to project managers, of the 12 leadership categories in the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, and the 5 primary information technology project success factors, there is a negative relationship between the interpersonal skills and leadership traits of project managers who manage with a passive leadership style and the primary IT systems development project success factor of value. In general, passive and negative leadership styles and interpersonal skills were a prevalent finding as it pertains to how the project manager viewed IT project cost, scheduling and value.

AdviserEdward Goldberg
SchoolCAPELLA UNIVERSITY
Source TypeDissertation
SubjectsManagement; Information technology; Organizational behavior
Publication Number3640259

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