The relationship between affective organizational commitment and organizational safety climate: A quantitative correlational study

by Ware, Brandy A. Farris, Ph.D., CAPELLA UNIVERSITY, 2014, 126 pages; 3621448

Abstract:

The primary purpose of this non-experimental correlational study was to investigate the extent to which there is a relationship between the variables of affective organizational commitment and organizational safety climate (and its constructs). The survey instrument included the TCM Organizational Commitment Survey as well as the NOSACQ-50 and was distributed via SurveyMonkey to employees within the U.S. leisure and hospitality industry. The survey was completed by 235 respondents, however 32 responses were eliminated due to the exclusion criteria, and thus 203 surveys were analyzed. Pearson correlation analysis was used to determine relationships among variables. The results found statistically significant positive correlations at the p=0.01 level between the variables of affective organizational commitment and organizational safety climate as well as between affective organizational commitment and all of the constructs of organizational safety climate. These correlational relationships ranged from moderate 0.272 for the relationship between affective commitment and workers' safety priority and risk non-acceptance to large 0.476 for the relationship between affective commitment and safety communication, learning, and trust in co-workers safety competence. The implications of this study suggest that there is a correlation between affective commitment and organizational safety climate and strength in one area tends to lend itself to strength in the other. Future research should be performed to further evaluate possible relationships of other types of organizational commitment and to evaluate possible differences due to management or non-management status or due to different segments within the U.S. leisure and hospitality industry.

AdviserEdward Goldberg
SchoolCAPELLA UNIVERSITY
Source TypeDissertation
SubjectsManagement; Organizational behavior
Publication Number3621448

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