The relationship between senior management's perception of the sustainability of project management value and the executive sponsorship role

by Chandler, Dawne E., Ph.D., CAPELLA UNIVERSITY, 2013, 136 pages; 3600916

Abstract:

The purpose of the research was to contribute to the project management (PM) body of knowledge by determining if a relationship exists between senior management’s perception of the sustainability of PM value and the formalization and support of the executive sponsorship role. Research has shown the interest in PM as a strategic tool may be waning. A gap in empirical research existed, and this research sought to understand the drivers that allow PM value to be sustainable. Using a newly designed survey instrument, this quantitative study examined responses from 91 U.S. executives in private sector organizations where PM practices were being used. A correlation analysis was used to investigate the relationships. Results indicated that the formalized executive role (medium effect) and executive sponsorship responsibilities training (small effect) significantly related to senior management’s perception of the sustainability of PM value, but no significant relationship (no effect) existed between the prevalence of the executive role within the organization and senior management’s perception of the sustainability of PM.

AdviserWerner Don Gottwald
SchoolCAPELLA UNIVERSITY
Source TypeDissertation
SubjectsManagement
Publication Number3600916

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