A quantitative examination of self-leadership impact on organizational commitment of IT employees in US companies

by AbuShmais, Ehab I., Ph.D., CAPELLA UNIVERSITY, 2013, 133 pages; 3594642

Abstract:

This study examined the relationship between self-leadership and organizational commitment in Information Technology (IT) employees. A review of the literature related to self-leadership has shown a direct relationship between employees with high levels of self-leadership and higher performance in the workplace. Also, a review of the literature related to organizational commitment has shown higher levels of organizational commitment have a direct positive relationship on employee attendance, company loyalty, and increased performance. Self-leadership strategies were analyzed in this study, as well as the variables related to organizational commitment, such as antecedents, correlates, and consequences. Two survey instruments were combined to create the survey used in this study, the Abbreviated Self-leadership Questionnaire (ASLQ) and the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire (OCQ). Participants in the study were full-time US employees over the age of 18 who worked in an IT capacity. In total, 169 respondents participated in the study. This study utilized a quantitative methodology to determine whether self-leadership influenced organizational commitment. The results showed a very small correlation between self-leadership and organizational commitment. The two variables, self-leadership and organizational commitment, both showed strong relationships to organizational performance. The research reliably demonstrated that higher levels of self-leadership lead to better workplace performance and employee effectiveness. This study may help businesses in the hiring and planning of an employee retention strategy, while also improving current high-performance employee’s skills through self-leadership strategies.

AdviserJean Gordon
SchoolCAPELLA UNIVERSITY
Source TypeDissertation
SubjectsManagement; Organization theory; Organizational behavior
Publication Number3594642

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