The relationship between ethical and authentic nurse leadership and the turnover intentions of staff nurses

by Yemi-Sofumade, Honoura B., Ph.D., CAPELLA UNIVERSITY, 2012, 195 pages; 3509122

Abstract:

As a considerable deficit of registered nurses (RNs) is expected in the U.S. because of the aging population, retaining experienced staff nurses to ensure the continuity of quality patient care and patient safety may become a priority for many healthcare providers. Research studies have related various traits, skills, and styles of nurse leadership to staff nurse work outcomes such as job satisfaction, organizational commitment and retention. However, the relationships that exist between perceived ethical nurse leadership characteristics and perceived authentic nurse leadership characteristics, and the voluntary turnover intentions of subordinate staff nurses were unknown. Using a sample of RNs based in the southeastern region of the U.S., a quantitative research study was conducted to assess the relationships between perceived ethical leadership characteristics and perceived authentic leadership characteristics of nurse leaders, and the turnover intentions of subordinate staff nurses. The results indicated that a strong positive correlation was found between perceived ethical nurse leadership characteristics and perceived authentic nurse leadership characteristics, and that significant negative relationships existed between perceived ethical nurse leadership and the turnover intentions of subordinate staff nurses, as well as between perceived authentic nurse leadership and the turnover intentions of subordinate staff nurses. Enhancing both the ethical leadership and authentic leadership characteristics of nurse leaders is suggested to create positive interpersonal working relationships and ethical work climates that may discourage turnover intentions and actual turnover among subordinate staff nurses.

AdviserValerie Coxon
SchoolCAPELLA UNIVERSITY
Source TypeDissertation
SubjectsManagement; Nursing; Organizational behavior; Health care management
Publication Number3509122

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