Diversity management: The common thread binding compliance, organizational culture, and best practices

by Hasson Barrett, Nicole, Ph.D., CAPELLA UNIVERSITY, 2012, 131 pages; 3503073

Abstract:

The problem addressed in this study was the lack of a strategic framework for a human resource or diversity professional to effectively manage diversity based on various perceptions. The purpose of this quantitative study was to explore diversity management perceptions of African American human resource (HR) professionals across organizations in the United States. The hypotheses for this study were as follows: (a) There is a statistical difference between African American HR professionals' perceptions of the work climate that support diversity and their organizational type as measured by a diversity climate instrument; (b) There is a statistical difference between African American HR professionals' perceptions of the work climate that support diversity and their gender as measured by a diversity climate instrument; and (c) There is a statistical relationship between African American HR professionals' perceptions of the work climate that support diversity and their Human Resource Certification Institute HR certification as measured by a diversity climate instrument. The target population for this study was African American HR professionals. A simple random sampling technique was used for the active members of the National Association of African American Human Resource for the sample population. The results found that African American HR professionals voiced discontent when compared to a nonminority group in regard to getting additional staff assistance or additional compensation increases above the average merit rate. The African American HR professionals responded that they were treated the same as nonminority employees when requesting time off, but the data revealed women may view that they are working harder and are as qualified as men but inequalities exist regarding compensation, upward mobility, and acknowledgement. The data revealed that attitudes toward the employment qualifications of racioethnic minorities and equality of department support of women were about the same when compared to nonminorities. The findings also provided a glimpse of the need for further analysis of the necessary requirements that HR professionals must possess in order to remain competitive in the work environment. An implication from the data was the necessity to further investigate organizational policies correlated to diversity management.

AdviserLilburn Hoehn
SchoolCAPELLA UNIVERSITY
Source TypeDissertation
SubjectsCultural resources management; Management; Operations research
Publication Number3503073

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