Comprehensive performance-process improvement: A grounded theory study of human performance improvement within process-focused improvement events
by Rau, Julie L., Ph.D., CAPELLA UNIVERSITY, 2011, 113 pages; 3481435

Abstract:

The purpose of this research was to investigate the role of human performance improvement in process-focused improvement events. The grounded theory method, a qualitative research approach, was used to study the relationship of human performance improvement within and as a result of a process improvement event. A literature review helped identify concepts, patterns, and themes to be studied. The findings for this study are based on observations of three process improvement events and in-depth interviews with four practitioners, two business process managers, and seven event participants. The observation notes, interview notes, and memo-writing were then used to discover codes, patterns, and themes used to analyze the data against the research questions. Data analysis demonstrated human performance was considered and affected by the event process during each process improvement focused event. The key themes to emerge include the improvement focus, role of process mapping in an improvement effort, the role of the process expert, and variety of intervention type. The emerging grounded theory is the grounded theory of comprehensive performance-process improvement. The grounded theory explains the relationship between human performance and the process improvement event and also recognizes the improvement event as a learning event.

 
AdviserRaj Singh
SchoolCAPELLA UNIVERSITY
SourceDAI/A 73-02, Dec 2011
Source TypeDissertation
SubjectsInstructional design; Management; Continuing education
Publication Number3481435
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