The impact of transformational leadership styles among minority leaders in the federal government

by Darden, Derrick C., Ph.D., CAPELLA UNIVERSITY, 2011, 131 pages; 3478084

Abstract:

The purpose of the study is to examine minorities preferred leader styles in the work environment of the federal government, particularly, those leadership styles described as transformational (Bass & Avolio, 1990). The researcher also examined whether there is a difference in leadership approaches and styles that are unique to minorities and women working for the federal government and if this difference hinders minorities from reaching the mid to senior level in the federal government (U.S. GAO, 2005). This study explored four research questions: Are there gender differences in terms of transformational leadership from levels GS 9 to GS 15 in the federal government? Are minority leaders in the federal government from levels GS 9 to GS 15 different from non-minority leaders in terms of transformational leadership? Are minority leaders in the federal government between GS 9 to GS 15 different from non-minority leaders in terms of their scores in the area of inspirational motivation? Are minority leaders in the federal government between GS 9 to GS 15 different from non-minority leaders in terms of their scores in the area of inspirational motivation? Are those identified as transformational leaders in the federal government more likely to be on a higher General Schedule (GS) level? The Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire 5X (short form) was used to measure transformational leadership (Bass & Avolio, 1991). The results of the study were not consistent with previous published studies based on the transformational leadership paradigm. Three of the four research questions had no significant findings. The fourth question was partially supported based on the inspirational motivation and individual consideration scores that varied by GS Levels 11–15. Additional research is needed in this area.

AdviserThomas L. Driver
SchoolCAPELLA UNIVERSITY
Source TypeDissertation
SubjectsManagement; Public administration; Ethnic studies
Publication Number3478084

About ProQuest Dissertations & Theses
With nearly 4 million records, the ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT) Global database is the most comprehensive collection of dissertations and theses in the world. It is the database of record for graduate research.

PQDT Global combines content from a range of the world's premier universities - from the Ivy League to the Russell Group. Of the nearly 4 million graduate works included in the database, ProQuest offers more than 2.5 million in full text formats. Of those, over 1.7 million are available in PDF format. More than 90,000 dissertations and theses are added to the database each year.

If you have questions, please feel free to visit the ProQuest Web site - http://www.proquest.com - or contact ProQuest Support.