Differences in managers' perceptions of virtual and traditional employees: A study in performance ratings of information technology professionals

by Glaser, Elizabeth A., Ph.D., CAPELLA UNIVERSITY, 2011, 109 pages; 3466512

Abstract:

The mere exposure theory was the theoretical orientation for this study. This study looked at the positive effect that mere exposure may have on the performance ratings that employees receive if they are working in a traditional environment where frequent contact between the employee and manager may result in a more positive evaluation than employees who work virtually and seldom come face to face with their manager. This study compared virtual and traditional employee performance ratings and hours devoted to work tasks. Using the description quantitative approach, this study sought to determine if there is a difference between the performance ratings a manager gives virtual and traditional employees and if the managers' perceptions of the virtual work environment affects the performance ratings managers give different types of employees. This study also examined whether virtual employees spend significantly more time devoted to work tasks than traditional employees. There was no significant difference between the performance ratings or time devoted to work tasks between virtual and traditional employees.

AdviserNancy Bostain
SchoolCAPELLA UNIVERSITY
Source TypeDissertation
SubjectsManagement; Occupational psychology; Organizational behavior
Publication Number3466512

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