Mentoring among African American women: A quantitative study

by Offutt, Paula K., Ph.D., CAPELLA UNIVERSITY, 2011, 117 pages; 3464773

Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to address the gap in the mentoring literature by identifying the mentoring attitudes of African American women regarding protégé potential, ability, need for help, possible barriers, and the effect on mentors’ career advancement. The research questions for this study were as follows: (a) What are the mentoring attitudes of African American women mentors regarding protégé potential, ability, and need of help? (b) What are the attitudes of African American women mentors regarding possible barriers? (c) What are the attitudes of African American women mentors regarding the effect of mentoring on their career advancement? and (d) What are the preferences of African American women mentors regarding protégé potential, ability, and need of help? The respondents were African American women who currently have or have had experience as a mentor or protégé. By using a quantitative methodology with nonparametric data techniques, the findings of the study indicated the African American women in the study had positive mentoring attitudes regarding protégé potential, ability, need of help, and possible barriers. The findings also indicated the African American women in the study believed mentoring will have a positive effect on their career advancement, and when selecting African American women as protégés, they prefer ability and potential over need of help. This exploratory study extends the research on mentoring relationships by providing an understanding of the mentoring attitudes of African American women regarding mentor–protégé relationships with other African American women.

AdviserRubye Howard-Braye
SchoolCAPELLA UNIVERSITY
Source TypeDissertation
SubjectsAfrican American studies; Black studies; Women's studies; Management
Publication Number3464773

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