The relationship between motivation and organizational citizenship behavior among customer support staff
by Rodriguez, Sergio, Ph.D., CAPELLA UNIVERSITY, 2010, 104 pages; 3428164

Abstract:

This study addressed the relationship between motivation and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). The study looked at the relationship between three different types of motivation (Overall, Intrinsic, and Extrinsic) and organizational citizenship behavior. The study also looked at the relationship between motivation and organizational citizenship behavior for customer support staff and compared the relationship between the two main support roles (Desktop and Helpdesk) and their gender (Male and Female). The study proposed that this research will assist I/O psychologists in understanding how motivation and organizational citizenship behavior are related among customer support staff in an organization. Quantitative methods were used to determine whether there were relationships among the variables in the study. To calculate these statistics, participants filled out two main surveys: one on motivation and one on organizational citizenship behavior. Descriptive statistics, the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient (r), and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to determine the existence and strength of these relationships. The answers to the research questions, and their hypotheses, are presented along with a discussion of these results and conclusions. Finally, recommendations for future research are presented.

 
AdviserSara Jarvis
SchoolCAPELLA UNIVERSITY
SourceDAI/B 72-01, Dec 2010
Source TypeDissertation
SubjectsBehavioral sciences; Occupational psychology; Organizational behavior
Publication Number3428164
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