A study of the relationship between commitment to the supervisor and followers' perception of leadership

by Polito, James A., Ph.D., CAPELLA UNIVERSITY, 2010, 111 pages; 3398338

Abstract:

The results of this research demonstrate the extent to which followers' commitment to the supervisor depends on a match between the followers’ perceived leadership model and the followers' perception of the supervisor's leadership behaviors. The results are based on a sample of 117 employees who completed the Leadership Practice Inventory (LPI) and Supervisor Related Commitment (SRC) survey. The LPI was used to assess followers' perceptions of ideal leader behaviors and their supervisor's behaviors. The SRC assessed followers' commitment to the supervisor. The results suggested a negative and significant relationship between commitment and the difference between the followers' perceptions of ideal leader behaviors and their supervisor's behaviors. The SRC total commitment and Enable Others LPI difference ( r = - .424, p = .000) was a moderate but significant relationship. The associations between the SRC total commitment and the other four LPI differences were low but significant (Model Way, r = - .279, p = .002; Inspire Vision, r = -.272, p = .003; Challenge Process, r = -.281, p = .002; Encourage, r = -.256, p = .005). Furthermore, regression analysis suggested that one LPI domain, Enable Others to Act (β = -.473, p = .001), was the strongest predictor of follower commitment to the supervisor. The results support the initial hypothesis of a relationship between commitment and a match between followers’ perceived leadership model and followers' perception of the supervisor's leadership behaviors.

AdviserJoseph R. Avella
SchoolCAPELLA UNIVERSITY
Source TypeDissertation
SubjectsManagement; Organizational behavior
Publication Number3398338

About ProQuest Dissertations & Theses
With nearly 4 million records, the ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT) Global database is the most comprehensive collection of dissertations and theses in the world. It is the database of record for graduate research.

PQDT Global combines content from a range of the world's premier universities - from the Ivy League to the Russell Group. Of the nearly 4 million graduate works included in the database, ProQuest offers more than 2.5 million in full text formats. Of those, over 1.7 million are available in PDF format. More than 90,000 dissertations and theses are added to the database each year.

If you have questions, please feel free to visit the ProQuest Web site - http://www.proquest.com - or contact ProQuest Support.