Job satisfaction of forensic scientists in the public sector

by Dooley, Jill M., Ph.D., CAPELLA UNIVERSITY, 2010, 105 pages; 3397890

Abstract:

Forensic scientists are an integral part of the criminal justice system. There are numerous sources for technical information with regard to forensic science, but an extensive literature search revealed no studies involving public-sector forensic scientists and their job satisfaction. This study attempted to identify factors of job satisfaction that affect this group of skilled professionals and to assess the overall level of job satisfaction. Using the abridged Job Descriptive Index (aJDI) and the abridged Jobs in General (aJIG) measurement instruments, several conclusions could be made. Work itself, opportunity for promotion, present pay, supervision, and coworkers were measured by the aJDI, overall job satisfaction was measured by the aJIG, and some demographic questions were utilized to measure variables such as age, tenure, and level of education. Evidence suggested that the population was dissatisfied with their opportunity for promotion as well as their current level of pay. This finding was made despite their overall high level of job satisfaction. Age, tenure, and level of education could not be significantly linked to the overall level of job satisfaction.

AdviserMary F. Whitman
SchoolCAPELLA UNIVERSITY
Source TypeDissertation
SubjectsManagement; Occupational psychology
Publication Number3397890

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