School principals as instructional leaders: An investigation of school leadership capacity in the Philippines

by Sindhvad, Swetal P., Ph.D., UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA, 2009, 143 pages; 3373426

Abstract:

Decentralization and school-based management are redefining the role of the school principal from school building manager to instructional leader. The principal’s core responsibility is to ensure quality teaching and learning in the classroom. However, in Asia many principals are not prepared for this new role and new focus.

This study identified factors related to the extent Filipino school principals thought they were capable of supporting teachers’ classroom instruction through instructional supervision, professional development, and classroom resources; and the extent they thought these instructional supports were effective. It also measured principals’ confidence in supporting teachers’ classroom instruction after participation in the instructional leadership training program, Instructional and Curricular Excellence in School Principalship for Southeast Asia (ICExCELS), offered by the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization Regional Center for Educational Innovation and Technology (SEAMEO INNOTECH). This study was conceptually grounded in the principal-agent relationship as described by Galal (2002) and Chapman (2008), as well as a model for teacher incentives by Kemmerer (1990). Bandura’s (1977) concept of self-efficacy served as a framework for investigating school principalship.

Analyses were conducted on data from 364 principals. Linear regression analysis showed that Filipino principals thought their capacity to support teachers through instructional supervision and professional development was dependent on their beliefs as to whether these instructional supports could make a difference in classroom instruction, their level of control, time they spent on instructional leadership and their degree of job satisfaction. Principals’ thought their capacity to support teachers through classroom resources was only dependent on their level of control over them and their beliefs as to whether they could make a difference in classroom instruction. Principals’ beliefs as to whether instructional supports could make a difference in classroom instruction was the most significant factor related to principals’ sense of capacity for providing instructional supervision and professional development, while their level of control was the more significant factor related to principals’ sense of capacity for providing classroom resources.

Results also showed that principals’ beliefs as to whether instructional supports were effective in supporting teachers’ classroom instruction were dependent upon how effective they think they are as school principals and how capable they think their teachers are in guiding student achievement. MANOVA results indicated no differences related to demographic and contextual factors among principals’ beliefs about their capacity to support teachers and their beliefs about the effectiveness of instructional supervision, professional development, and classroom resources. Seventy-five percent of principals attributed their capacity to the hands-on training they received.

The findings are important for formulation and implementation of school-based management policies, and for the design of education reform initiatives and training programs supporting school principals to be instructional leaders.

AdviserDavid W. Chapman
SchoolUNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA
Source TypeDissertation
SubjectsEducational administration
Publication Number3373426

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