An analysis of the preferred managerial tactics of health care organization employees

by Nguyen, Krystianna K., Ph.D., CAPELLA UNIVERSITY, 2009, 109 pages; 3359690

Abstract:

Health care managers often use various tactics as a way to influence employees’ behavior to elevate productivity levels. Although the literature contains a plethora of articles on three broad tactics categories (e.g., soft, rational, hard), there is a dearth of research on the influence of sex and health care job categories on managerial tactics preferences. The present research focused on employees’ perception of soft, rational, and hard management tactics of health care organizations. Specifically, this study examined the relationships of sex and health care job categories on managerial tactics preferences, controlling age, race, and tenure, among medical doctors, nurses, information technology, and ancillary personnel of health care organizations. Participants were derived from various healthcare settings through the convenience sampling technique. A revised questionnaire of Kipnis, Stuart, and Wilkinson (1980) served as the subscale for data collection. Internal consistency measures of the questionnaire were in the acceptable to very reliable range (Coefficient alphas ranging from .658–.736). MANCOVA was used to determine if there were significant differences of preferences on soft tactics and rational tactics among occupational categories as well as between males and females. Due to unequal comparison group sizes and data distribution and shape issues, a non-parametric t-test (Mann-Whitney U) was used to compute preferred hard tactics for males and females, while a Kruskal-Wallis was used to compute preferred hard tactics for occupational categories. There was a significant difference of preferences in the hard tactics between males and females (p ≤ .002). There were no significant differences of preferences on soft tactics and rational tactics between males and females. There were no significant differences of preferences on soft and hard tactics among occupational categories. However, there was a significant difference of preferences on rational tactics among occupational categories with (p ≤ .017). These findings suggest that the influence strategies managers use may need to depend on the organizational culture defined by occupational groups and sex of the workers. Future research would benefit from implementing recruitment strategies to increase sample size and/or target specific groups to be studied to as to have equal comparison group sizes.

AdviserAntonio Santonastasi
SchoolCAPELLA UNIVERSITY
Source TypeDissertation
SubjectsManagement; Occupational psychology; Health care management
Publication Number3359690

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