The relationship of leadership styles and recognition of retiring Boomers as potential volunteers: A study of nonprofit administrators

by Pettine, Susan B., Ph.D., CAPELLA UNIVERSITY, 2007, 213 pages; 3242152

Abstract:

The purpose of the correlation research study was to examine how self-described transactional and transformational volunteer administration leaders in nonprofit organizations are prepared to tap into the potential volunteer pool of Baby Boomers as these Boomers prepare for retirement. This study drew on volunteer administrators and human resources professionals who handle volunteer recruitment and retention who had joined a national professional society, the Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM). The Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ) was administered for self-perception assessments regarding leadership style. A researcher-designed questionnaire was used to determine self-perceptive issues regarding future expansion of volunteer recruitment and retention programs. Results suggest that volunteer administrators that exhibit transactional leadership styles as recorded by the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ) additionally value the potential of retiring Baby Boomers as possible volunteers for nonprofit organizations. Results further suggest that generally the age of volunteer administrators did not correlate with a more comprehensive understanding of the potential that retiring Baby Boomers offer as possible volunteers for nonprofit organizations. There were three exceptions. The results did show that those volunteer administrators who were in the age categories of 45 and over demonstrated a stronger understanding of the coming impact of retiring Baby Boomers, the potential that retiring Baby Boomers offer as possible volunteers for nonprofit organizations, and the value of the input that current Baby Boomer volunteers can provide in creating an attractive recruitment and retention program for Baby Boomer volunteers. Results also suggest that generally those volunteer administrators that exhibited transformational leadership styles as well as those that exhibited transactional leadership styles were both prepared to tap into the potential volunteer pool of Baby Boomers. There were three exceptions in these results. The results did show that those volunteer administrators that exhibited transformational leadership styles demonstrated stronger commitment than transactional leaders with regard to having strong recruitment programs in place, having an effective plan in place for accessing the potential pool of volunteers that retiring Baby Boomers represent, and valuing of the importance of having structured performance evaluation plans for nonprofit volunteers.

AdviserJohnny Morris
SchoolCAPELLA UNIVERSITY
Source TypeDissertation
SubjectsManagement
Publication Number3242152

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