An Investigation of Touch DNA Collection Methods from Clothing: Traditional Cutting Techniques Versus a Wet Vacuum System

by Wander, Marc John, M.S., UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS, 2014, 52 pages; 1565737

Abstract:

This study explored an innovative method for recovering a male offender's touch DNA deposited on the external side of a cotton t-shirt worn by a female. Traditional cutting procedures were compared, in parallel, to a novel wet vacuum system, called the M-Vac®. This investigation compared these two collection methods to discover which method resulted in a higher yield of DNA, and also examined the relative amounts of male and female DNA obtained from clothing worn by a female and grabbed by a male, with the intent of mimicking an assault. The collected DNA was extracted and then quantified using the Quantifiler® Duo DNA Quantification Kit. STR profiles were analyzed using the AmpFISTR® Identifiler ® PCR Amplification Kit. The average yield of male DNA obtained after a male grabbed the shirt with dry hands was 1.5 ng and 14 ng for cuttings and M-Vac samples, respectively. Compared to cuttings, this demonstrated a 9.7 fold increase (p = 0.0079) of male DNA when the M-Vac was employed for collection. Another variable explored was the impact sweat may have on the amount of touch DNA deposited. The average yield of male DNA obtained after a male grabbed the shirt with sweaty hands was 4.5 ng and 25 ng for cuttings and M-Vac samples, respectively. Compared to cuttings, a 5.8 fold increase (p = 0.0042) of male DNA was observed when the M-Vac was used for sample collection. In this study, the M-Vac was significantly more effective at obtaining touch DNA than fabric cuttings, thus warranting further investigation. The M-Vac could be useful for recovering touch DNA as evidence in the forensic science field.

AdviserEdward A. Panacek
SchoolUNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS
Source TypeThesis
SubjectsMolecular biology; Criminology
Publication Number1565737

About ProQuest Dissertations & Theses
With nearly 4 million records, the ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT) Global database is the most comprehensive collection of dissertations and theses in the world. It is the database of record for graduate research.

PQDT Global combines content from a range of the world's premier universities - from the Ivy League to the Russell Group. Of the nearly 4 million graduate works included in the database, ProQuest offers more than 2.5 million in full text formats. Of those, over 1.7 million are available in PDF format. More than 90,000 dissertations and theses are added to the database each year.

If you have questions, please feel free to visit the ProQuest Web site - http://www.proquest.com - or contact ProQuest Support.