Faculty-to-faculty incivility among nurse educators and its relationship to role satisfaction and workplace commitment

by Frye, Nadeena D., Ph.D., CAPELLA UNIVERSITY, 2015, 144 pages; 10014047

Abstract:

The purpose of this correlation study was to examine the perceptions of faculty-to-faculty incivility among nurse educators and its relationship to role satisfaction and workplace commitment in order to better understand the dynamics of these professionals. A purposeful convenience sample consisted of 114 volunteer participants from a population of 534 full-time nursing faculty from 22 accredited colleges and universities offering associates, bachelors, masters, and doctoral degrees in nursing in a Midwestern state. Data was collected by administering a web-based Likert-style survey over the course of six weeks which yielded a response rate of 21%. The survey consisted of three existing tools: Workplace Incivility Scale (Cortina, Magley, Williams, & Langhout, 2001) (α = .92), Job Satisfaction Survey (Parkes, Mendham, & von Rabenau, 1994) (α = .86), and the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire (Mowday, Steers, & Porter, 1979) (α = .90) which provided data for calculating Pearson Product Moment Correlations for the constructs of faculty-to-faculty incivility, role satisfaction, and workplace commitment. Results of the Pearson correlation between incivility and role satisfaction indicated a statistically significant inverse relationship (r = -0.55, p < .001). A Pearson correlation between incivility and workplace commitment indicated a statistically significant inverse relationship (r = -0.57, p < .001). Results of the Pearson correlation between incivility and workplace commitment indicated a statistically significant positive relationship (r = 0.73, p < .001). Limitations for this study included the use of a convenience sample, the moderate sample size, and the small degree of diversity among participants. Implications for practice focused on potential factors which contribute to retention of nursing faculty, development of policies addressing faculty-to-faculty incivility in nursing education, as well as initiatives promoting role satisfaction and workplace commitment. Future research should focus on the perceptions of faculty from various gender, ethnic, and generational groups as well as differences between levels of educational preparation and tenure status..

AdviserNancy C. Smulsky
SchoolCAPELLA UNIVERSITY
Source TypeDissertation
SubjectsManagement; Nursing; Organizational behavior; Higher education
Publication Number10014047

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